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TOPIC: News articles and other media for inspiration

News articles and other media for inspiration 2 months 1 day ago #2906

  • DarkTraveler777
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Hey everyone!

I am always looking for new ideas to include in my games, and since Wreck Age is grounded somewhat in reality, I thought it would be fun to start a thread in which we could share news articles, videos, or other media that could offer inspiration for playing in the Wreck Age world.

Such materials could include news stories on renewable energy sources, next-tech level weaponry, advancements in medical science, climate science, etc. As long as it pertains to how the world of Wreck Age could be shaped or influenced by the subject matter it is fair game to discuss (unless a Mod or Admin says otherwise ;)).

As an example, here is an article from the the Independent about fracking and a recent discovery of high levels of radioactive materials in water near fracking sites.

Now, this isn't a thread to discuss the merits of fracking, but rather, how would this information be useful for games of Wreck Age?

Since most people living in Resurgence-era Mericka abhor the devastating technologies which helped trash the planet and bring about the Exodus, would communities use fracking? Probably not is my opinion but, what about a community with the know-how to create items that would require radioactive materials? Some medicines, weapons and other goods do utilize radioactive materials, so in that sense would a community frack in order to produce say, depleted uranium shells or some advanced medicine?

If your community is opposed to fracking, but learns that a Reclaimer sect is doing it over yonder mountains, threatening your community's water supply, what do you do? Do you fight? What if it turns out that the radioactive materials the Reclaimers are seeking are for a beneficial piece of recently discovered technology that could have a wide ranging effect on the sustainability of not just your community but the region as a whole?

Share your thoughts or ideas for the story below, or if you have something you'd like to discuss post away!

www.independent.co.uk/news/science/frack...-Xhay124X4B1oivprR7g

*for the work blocked*
The vast amount of waste water produced by fracking can contaminate rivers, lakes and other waterways with radioactive material and hormone-affecting chemicals, according to new research.

The study tested sediments and groundwater downstream of a treatment plant in Pennsylvania that was designed to make the water used as part of the fracking process fit for release into the environment.

The scientists, from Pennsylvania State University and other academic institutions, discovered that despite this process there were “high loads of chloride, barium, strontium, radium and organic compounds” in the Conemaugh River watershed.

Stream sediments in Blacklick Creek, just downstream from one treatment plant, were found to contain about 200 times the level of radium upstream of the plant.

The highest concentration of radium found was just 14 per cent below the level at which it would have to be treated as radioactive waste in some US states.

However the researchers said the risks of the pollutants discovered were “difficult to assess”.

Writing in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, the scientists said: “Large quantities of oil-and-gas wastewater with high loads of chloride, barium, strontium, radium, and organic compounds have been discharged into the Conemaugh River watershed.

“Stream sediments in Blacklick Creek immediately downstream of centralised waste treatment plant number one were found to contain [radium] levels that were about 200 times greater than activities measured in upstream and background sediments.

“Elevated concentrations of radium and other alkaline earth metals have now been detected in reservoir sediments about 19km farther downstream of this plant.

“Despite several other sources of contaminants such as coal bed methane, coal mine drainage, and flue gas desulfurization releases that can impact surface water quality, we document multiple lines of evidence that indicate the legacy of unconventional oil-and-gas wastewater disposal has impacted stream sediments and porewater [groundwater] on a watershed-scale.”

They said while the amount of fracking wastewater was “relatively small” compared to the volume of the stream it “nonetheless had a measurable impact”.

“Risks posed by the pollutants buried in the sediment and porewater of the Conemaugh River Lake are difficult to assess,” the paper added. The watershed is not used as a source of drinking water, the researchers added.

Fracking involves forcing water and other substances, which can include radioactive ones, into cracks in porous rocks that contain significant amounts of fossil fuels.

It has become common in the US, accounting for more than half of oil production and two-thirds of gas production.

In the UK, the Conservatives have said they want to see a fracking ‘revolution’ in the hope of providing a noticeable boost to the economy.

But the party’s general election manifesto said this could only be done “if we maintain public confidence in the process, if we uphold our rigorous environmental protections, and if we ensure the proceeds of the wealth generated by shale energy are shared with the communities affected”.

Environmentalists argue that developing fracking in Britain is a mistake because it is opening up another source of fossil fuels when the country should be looking to reduce emissions. Supporters argue that gas produced in this way is ‘greener’ than coal or oil.

The Conservative think tank Bright Blue has argued the priority should instead be to promote cheap renewable energy, like wind and solar.
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News articles and other media for inspiration 1 month 4 weeks ago #2907

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They should bottle that water and tell us that radium water was in fact beneficial.

Our good buddy Tim's wife as an empty radium water jug. Slowly killing him I am sure.
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News articles and other media for inspiration 1 month 1 week ago #2912

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Radium Water sounds like an awesome energy drink name. It would have the opposite effect I suppose, though. :dry:
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News articles and other media for inspiration 1 month 1 week ago #2913

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The International Museum of Surgical Science has a bunch of them on display. It's fairly incredible what people thought was healthy and beneficial in the past.
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News articles and other media for inspiration 1 month 2 days ago #2915

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I always wonder which medical treatments we are using which will be mocked in the future.

Chemo seems like one such treatment.

Speaking of medical advances, who wants to be a Stitcher?

www.singularityarchive.com/oxford-univer...uild-organs-tissues/
University of Oxford scientists have developed a new method for 3D-printing laboratory-grown cells to form living structures.

The new method enables the production of complex tissues and cartilage that can potentially support, repair or augment diseased and damaged areas of the body.

The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates how human and animal cells can be 3D printed into high-resolution tissue constructs.

Developing an efficient 3D printer for living tissues has been a challenge for researchers due to the difficulty of controlling and positioning cells in a 3D environment. The cells can shift inside printed tissues and the scaffolding printed to support the cells can collapse on itself.

The Oxford researchers new approach is able to build tissues in self-contained cells that support the structures to maintain their shape.In order or protect the cells the researchers placed them inside nanolitre droplets wrapped in a lipid coating that can be combined into living structures. Protecting the cells this way improves the survival rate of the individual cells and lets tissues be built more precisely.

The approach also allows for the creation of patterned cellular constructs, which can mimic and potentially enhance natural tissues and organs.“We were aiming to fabricate three-dimensional living tissues that could display the basic behaviours and physiology found in natural organisms. To date, there are limited examples of printed tissues, which have the complex cellular architecture of native tissues. Hence, we focused on designing a high-resolution cell printing platform, from relatively inexpensive components, that could be used to reproducibly produce artificial tissues with appropriate complexity from a range of cells including stem cells.” said Dr Alexander Graham, lead author and 3D Bioprinting Scientist at OxSyBio

In the future the researchers hope that products of their 3D bioprinter could significantly impact medicine.

“There are many potential applications for bioprinting and we believe it will be possible to create personalised treatments by using cells sourced from patients to mimic or enhance natural tissue function.” said Dr. Sam Olof, Chief Technology Officer at OxSyBio.Over the coming months they will work to develop new complementary printing techniques, that will allow the use of a wider range of living and hybrid materials, with the aim of producing tissues at industrial scale.

The researchers have created a startup called OxSyBio to commercialize their 3D bioprinter.
Last Edit: 1 month 2 days ago by DarkTraveler777.
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News articles and other media for inspiration 4 weeks 14 hours ago #2916

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Here is another article that is interesting. Kelp farming for fun and profit!

theconversation.com/sea-the-possibilitie...eed-in-the-mix-82748

Here is an excerpt from the article:
The stupendous potential of seaweed farming as a tool to combat climate change was outlined in 2012 by the University of the South Pacific’s Dr Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt and his team. Their analysis reveals that if 9% of the ocean were to be covered in seaweed farms, the farmed seaweed could produce 12 gigatonnes per year of biodigested methane which could be burned as a substitute for natural gas. The seaweed growth involved would capture 19 gigatonnes of CO₂. A further 34 gigatonnes per year of CO₂ could be taken from the atmosphere if the methane is burned to generate electricity and the CO₂ generated captured and stored. This, they say:

…could produce sufficient biomethane to replace all of today’s needs in fossil-fuel energy, while removing 53 billion tonnes of CO₂ per year from the atmosphere… This amount of biomass could also increase sustainable fish production to potentially provide 200 kilograms per year, per person, for 10 billion people. Additional benefits are reduction in ocean acidification and increased ocean primary productivity and biodiversity.
Nine per cent of the world’s oceans is not a small area. It is equivalent to about four and a half times the area of Australia. But even at smaller scales, kelp farming has the potential to substantially lower atmospheric CO₂, and this realisation has had an energising impact on the research and commercial development of sustainable aquaculture. But kelp farming is not solely about reducing CO₂. In fact, it is being driven, from a commercial perspective, by sustainable production of high-quality protein.
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